MSN Actions: News from Mexico Solidarity Network; etc..

MSN Actions: News from Mexico Solidarity Network; etc..

News from Mexico Solidarity Network

Mexico Solidarity Network

http://www.mexicosolidarity.org/

Red de Solidaridad con Mexico

MEXICO SOLIDARITY NETWORK

WEEKLY NEWS AND ANALYSIS

SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2008

1. ECONOMIC CRISIS AFFECTS FAMILY REMITTANCES

2. NEGOTIATORS FAIL TO REACH AGREEMENT IN TEACHER STRIKE

3. NEW CHARGES EXPECTED IN BRAD WILL CASE

4. PFP RAIDS AFI

5. MSN PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS (Contact MSN@MexicoSolidarity.org)

1. ECONOMIC CRISIS AFFECTS FAMILY REMITTANCES

Family remittances from migrant workers in the US are expected to decrease by at least US$2.5 billion during the coming year, a decline of almost 10% over 2008, according to Treasury Secretary Agustin Carstens. “We are entering a much more complicated period than we expected,” said the normally upbeat Carstens during testimony before the Senate. Family remittances are the main source of financial support for more than 10% of Mexican families.

2. NEGOTIATORS FAIL TO REACH AGREEMENT IN TEACHER STRIKE

Negotiators failed to reach an agreement in the six week teachers strike in Morelos that has kept most of the state’s public schools from opening. More than 20,000 of the state’s 25,000 teachers are on strike, demanding an end to the Alliance for Quality Education (ACE) signed in May by President Felipe Calderon and Elba Esther Gordillo, “permanent president” of the National Union of Education Workers (SNTE). Teachers object to provisions in the ACE that violate their labor rights, including mandatory periodic evaluations. Many current teachers either bought their positions from previous teachers or inherited them from family members, and the ACE would prohibit these kinds of hereditary transactions. Given the high levels of unemployment in Mexico and the highly politicized nature of evaluations, teachers are concerned about the stability of their positions, especially those who oppose the virtual dictatorship exercised by Gordillo over the 1.3 million member union. Gordillo is closely allied with Calderon and was probably responsible for a good deal of the electoral fraud that brought the current president to power. The ACE would increase her already powerful control over Latin America’s largest union. Teachers in Morelos have taken the lead in challenging the ACE, but many teachers around the country are opposed to the plan and to Gordillo’s increasingly corrupt and problematic control of the union. On Tuesday, thousands of teachers from six states participated in marches, meetings and building occupations in opposition to Gordillo, the ACE and last year’s privatization of much of the Social Security Institute for State Workers (ISSSTE). On Saturday, the National Coordinator of Education Workers (CNTE), a dissident faction of the teacher’s union, called for a national conference to overturn the ACE.

3. NEW CHARGES EXPECTED IN BRAD WILL CASE

The Federal Attorney General signaled this week that members of the Popular Assembly of the People of Oaxaca (APPO) will be charged in the murder of US journalist Brad Will. Will died in October 2006 during confrontations between the APPO and paramilitary forces aligned with Governor Ulises Ruiz. Will was videotaping at the time of his death and recorded paramilitaries firing weapons in his direction. But the Attorney General claims Will was short at close range, less than two feet, by members of the APPO. Photos taken of a shirtless Will immediately after he was shot show only one bullet wound in the stomach area, yet the Attorney General claims a bullet wound discovered later on his right side was the cause of death.

4. PFP RAIDS AFI

In a surreal action that likely left Mexico’s organized crime bosses chuckling, 300 heavily armed Federal Preventative Police (PFP) raided the Mexico City offices of the Federal Agency of Investigation (AFI, the rough equivalent of the FBI) on Thursday. AFI agents engaged in a series of increasing public protests this week claiming labor rights violations and objecting to their imminent transfer to the PFP. Since the beginning of his sexenio, President Calderon has called for the integration of all federal policing agencies into a single unit called the Federal Police. Legislation is pending but has not yet been considered by Congress, yet for months the administration has been consolidating the PFP and the AFI under one coordinator to facilitate the eventual formation of a single force. In this context, AFI agents have been forced to sign new labor contracts that don’t recognize accumulated seniority rights. On Wednesday, disgruntled AFI agents organized an unprecedented public march from their offices to the Federal Attorney General (PGR) demanding respect for their labor rights. The PGR cuts paychecks for the 5,000 AFI agents, and a commander from the Secretary for Public Security (SSP), part of Calderon’s cabinet, oversees AFI operations. On Thursday, AFI agents visited Congress and invited four Deputies to visit the their offices and document the virtual dismantling of what was Mexico’s premier national police force under the Fox administration. The rationale for Thursday’s raid was not immediately clear, and no AFI agents were arrested.

5. MSN PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS (Contact MSN@MexicoSolidarity.org)

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM:

All Mexico Solidarity Network study abroad programs are accredited at the undergraduate and masters level by the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, one of Mexico’s most prestigious public universities. Hampshire College is the US school of record and provides official transcripts.

Fall 2008, September 7 – December 13: Study in Chiapas, Tlaxcala, Mexico City and Ciudad Juarez, focusing on the theory and practice of Mexican social movements, including indigenous movements, campesino organizations, and urban movements. The 14-week, 16-credit program includes intensive Spanish language courses and alternative study options for native Spanish speakers.

Spring 2009, January 25 – May 2: Study in Chiapas, Tlaxcala, Mexico City and Ciudad Juarez, focusing on the theory and practice of Mexican social movements, including indigenous movements, campesino organizations, and urban movements. The 14-week, 16-credit program includes intensive Spanish language courses and alternative study options for native Spanish speakers.

Summer 2009, June 7 – August 1: Study Mexico’s most important social movements in Chiapas, Mexico City and Tlaxcala. The eight-week, 11-credit program includes intensive Spanish classes and alternative study options for native Spanish speakers.

Summer 2009, June 14 – July 25: The Border Dynamics program focuses on US-Mexico border dynamics viewed through a third world feminist lens. The six-week, 8-credit program is Spanish immersion.

Fall 2009, September 6 – December 12: Study in Chiapas, Tlaxcala, Mexico City and Ciudad Juarez, focusing on the theory and practice of Mexican social movements, including indigenous movements, campesino organizations, and urban movements. The 14-week, 16-credit program includes intensive Spanish language courses and alternative study options for native Spanish speakers.

CHICAGO AUTONOMOUS CENTER (3460 W. LAWRENCE AVE.)

ESL and Spanish Literacy classes: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday evenings, and Saturday mornings. Classes utilize popular education strategies to increase conversational English capacity and basic reading and writing skills in Spanish.

Cultural events and political workshops:

For a full schedule of cultural events and political workshops, contact the Mexico Solidarity Network at 773-583-7728 or visit http://www.mexicosolidarity.org/communityforum

SPEAKING TOURS:

Contact MSN@MexicoSolidarity.org to schedule an event in your city.

October 19-31, 2008 (Northwest): Plan Mexico. Carlos Euceda will discuss Plan Mexico (aka the Merida Initiative), a bilateral security initiative that will provide $1.5 billion in US military financing for Mexico’s army and intelligence forces.

October 12-24, 2008 (New England): Border dynamics. Veronica Leyva, a native of Ciudad Juarez, will speak about maquiladoras, immigration and struggles for land along the border, with particular emphasis on the Lomas de Poleo struggle. Veronia is the MSN staff person in Ciudad Juarez. She worked for seven years in maquiladoras and six years as a labor/community organizer before joining the MSN staff in 2004.

November 9-21, 2008 (Midwest): Immigration dynamics and Braceros. A representative of the National Assembly of ex-Braceros from Tlaxcala will discuss current struggles by Braceros and the lessons of the Bracero program for the debate on immigration reform. Braceros were Mexican guest workers who came to the US under a post-World War II treaty.

November 9-21, 2008 (California): Immigration dynamics and Braceros. A representative of the National Assembly of ex-Braceros from Tlaxcala will discuss current struggles by Braceros and the lessons of the Bracero program for the debate on immigration reform. Braceros were Mexican guest workers who came to the US under a post-World War II treaty. Macrina Cardenas, President of the MSN board of directors, will accompany the tour.

February 8-21, 2009 (Southeast): Border dynamics. Veronica Leyva, a native of Ciudad Juarez, will speak about maquiladoras, immigration and struggles for land along the border, with particular emphasis on the Lomas de Poleo struggle. Veronia is the MSN staff person in Ciudad Juarez. She worked for seven years in maquiladoras and six years as a labor/community organizer before joining the MSN staff in 2004.

February 15-28, 2009 (Mid Atlantic): Immigration dynamics and Braceros. A representative of the National Assembly of ex-Braceros from Tlaxcala will discuss current struggles by Braceros and the lessons of the Bracero program for the debate on immigration reform. Braceros were Mexican guest workers who came to the US under a post-World War II treaty.

March 15-28, 2009 (New York state): Free trade, fair trade and the dynamics of alternative economies.

March 22 – April 4, 2009 (Midwest): Immigration dynamics, featuring migrant workers from the Midwest.

March 29 – April 11, 2009 (New England): Urban housing struggles and the war against popular organizations in Mexico.

April 5-18, 2009 (West Coast): The Other Campaign and campesino organizing, featuring an organizer from the Concejo Nacional Urbano Campesino.

ALTERNATIVE ECONOMY INTERNSHIPS:

Develop markets for artisanry produced by women’s cooperatives in Chiapas and make public presentations on the struggle for justice and dignity in Zapatista communities.

Interns are currently active in: New York City; El Paso, TX; Salt Lake City, UT; Rochester, NY; Albuquerque, NM; Washington, DC; Chico, CA; Stonington, ME; Minneapolis, MN; Berkeley, CA; Grand Rapids, MI; Salem, OR; Santa Cruz, CA; Chatham, NJ; Rutland, MA; Chicago, IL; Corpus Christi, TX; and Houston, TX.

Please accept our apologies if you have received this email in error. To be removed from the Mexico Solidarity Network mailing list, please send a blank message to allies-unsubscribe@mexicosolidarity.org.

If this message has been forwarded to you and you would like to subscribe to the Mexico Solidarity Network mailing list, please visit http://www.mexicosolidarity.org and use the subscription feature provided, or send a blank message to allies-subscribe@mexicos

 

 

 

 

Unique study opportunity in Mexico

Mexico Solidarity Network

Red de Solidaridad con Mexico

2009 Study Abroad Opportunities in Mexico

Study with some of Mexico’s most important active social movements, including:

– Indigenous movements in Chiapas

– The Frente Popular Francisco Villa Independiente, Mexico’s largest urban housing movement

– The Concejo Nacional Urbano Campesino, one of Mexico’s most important rural movements (and located in Tlaxcala, the heart of the best food in Mexico!)

– Families of femicide victims in Ciudad Juarez

These unique programs feature home stays with members of social movements, which encourages unprecedented learning opportunities with organizers on the front line in struggles against neoliberalism. The program combines experiential learning with theoretical work in a seminar and workshop based environment focused on student participation.

The programs are accredited by the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, one of Mexico’s most important public universities. Hampshire College is the US school of record and provides official transcripts. The program is also formally recognized by the University of Texas-Austin, New Mexico State University, the State University of New York (SUNY) via SUNY at Albany, Appalachian State University, and many others.

Fall and Spring semesters are 14 week, 16-credit programs that travel the length and breadth of Mexico, including Chiapas, Mexico City, Tlaxcala and Ciudad Juarez:

Spring 2009: January 25 – May 2

 

Fall 2009: September 6 – December 12

Two summer 2009 programs focus on:

Border dynamics, with an emphasis on third world feminism. This six week course offers 8 credits and is based in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez. The course is Spanish immersion with classes and most readings in Spanish.

June 14 – July 25 Mexican social movements. This eight week course offers 10 credits and is based in Chiapas, Mexico City and Tlaxcala.

June 7 – August 1

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Programs have a tendency to fill quickly, so apply early to assure your spot.

For more information, see our web site at http://www.mexicosolidarity.org or contact

MSN@MexicoSolidarity.org.

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About reality

Also, thanx for signing my petitions, et al, please consider sharing them. Also, since Admin. of change.org aren't allowing me to invite people to do my actions lately and are switching my urls for my petitions so when I invite people off their site they can't get to the petition either (ergo 3 possible urls for each petition), here's a few of my latest actions; do as few or as many as you'd like (there are 3 linx for each petition because admin. switches between the 3 of them so people trying to sign the petition can‘t get to it): This post on Disabled Greens News and discussion: Haiti disaster anniversary, please, do what you can: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DisabledGreensNews/message/9033 This petition on change.org: Haiti disaster anniversary: http://www.change.org/petitions/view/haiti_disaster_anniversary_2?share_id=yIpWHEHxri&pe=pce http://uspoverty.change.org/petitions/view/haiti_disaster_anniversary_2 http://www.change.org/petitions/view/haiti_disaster_anniversary_2   This post on Disabled Greens News and discussion: Green, Indigenous, Native American, etc., actions: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DisabledGreensNews/message/9026 This petition on change.org: Green, Indigenous, Native American, acts: http://www.change.org/petitions/view/green_indigenous_native_american_acts?share_id=NHvTtQadfP&pe=pce http://uspoverty.change.org/petitions/view/green_indigenous,_native_american_acts http://www.change.org/petitions/view/green_indigenous,_native_american_acts   This post on Disabled Greens News and discussion: Art/Act: celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, holiday: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DisabledGreensNews/message/9024 This petition on change.org: Art/Act: celebrate Dr. M.L. King, Jr.'s holiday: http://www.change.org/petitions/view/artact_celebrate_dr_ml_king_jrs_holiday?share_id=QjOkAUGeBQ&pe=pce http://uspoverty.change.org/petitions/view/art_act_celebrate_dr_ml_king_jr_s_holiday http://www.change.org/petitions/view/art_act_celebrate_dr_ml_king_jr_s_holiday   This post on Disabled Greens News and discussion: Green; NA; the evolution; Civil, Human, LP, Prisoner's Rights; Poverty; etc..: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DisabledGreensNews/message/9022 This petition on change.org: Economically empower through advocacy: http://www.change.org/petitions/view/economically_empower_through_advocacy?share_id=WZNqBQWcXE&pe=pce http://uspoverty.change.org/petitions/view/economically_empower_through_advocacy http://www.change.org/petitions/view/economically_empower_throug
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